Portrait of Lucinda Southern

Lucinda Southern

Lucinda Southern is media editor at Adweek, where she covers the business of media including publishers, social media platforms and digital transformation. Before joining Adweek in 2020, Lucinda spent five years at Digiday. Lucinda holds an M.A. from the University of Bristol.

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2022 Will Be a Year of Unintended Consequences From the Pivot to Privacy

Outlook

Publishers and platforms brace for a battle over contextual data.

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Cookie Quest: How the Ad Industry Tackled Identity in 2021

Platforms

This year there have been high and low points in the industry’s identity quest.

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AT&T Sells Xandr to Microsoft

Programmatic

The deal bolsters Microsoft's CTV ad capabilities.

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How Ranker Grew Revenue Fourfold Thanks to Its First-Party Data Play

Publishing

Ranker used its data to target audiences in more sophisticated ways beyond context.

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What to Know About Google’s Grant of Greater Oversight of Privacy Sandbox by UK Watchdog

Programmatic

As part of an ongoing antitrust investigation into Google’s Privacy Sandbox, the tech giant has agreed to an expanded set of commitments.

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How News UK’s Times Radio Is Driving Ad Revenue and New Subscribers

Publishing

Times Radio had 30 commercial partners before listener figures were reported.

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For Pinterest, User Numbers Are Down While Revenue and Stock Are Up

Platforms

Revenue is up because the platform is generating higher revenue per user.

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What to Know About Facebook’s Latest Effort to Woo Creators With Subscriptions

Platforms

The updates aim to let creators keep more of the money they make.

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NFTs Face a Setback as Brands and Publishers Consider Environmental Implications

Blockchain

Still looking for that lean, green, nonfungible token minting machine.

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The New York Times’ CEO Meredith Levien on Balancing News and Lifestyle Products

Publishing

The Times calculates there’s a market of 100 million English speakers who will pay for news